The Fatherly 50 List of Best Employers for New Dads Shows Progress (at the top)

Fatherly compiled a list of the best employers for new dads
Fatherly compiled a list of the best employers for new dads

Yesterday, Fatherly.com released its annual ranking of the 50 Best Employers for New Dads 2017. The list highlights large companies from many sectors that have implemented policies and programs supporting new dads and working parents.

(Disclosure: I serve as an unpaid subject matter expert for this project)

The list of best employers for new dads is especially important for showing what is possible.

  • For employers, this could lead to a “race to the top” in which they compete against each other for top talent by expanding their benefits and changing their cultures.
  • It can show the business community that there is no tradeoff between being a financially successful company and an accommodating employer. In fact, it makes a compelling argument that the two are self-reinforcing.
  • For dads, this list can give us an idea of what leading companies are offering. We can look for employment at companies with similar policies in our job searches. Similarly, we can share this information with our bosses and HR departments and advocate for the expansion of family-supportive programs.

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Effective Advocacy from Al Horford and His Sister

Al Horford and his sister demonstrated effective advocacy for working dads in their response to Mike Fleger’s criticism over Horford’s paternity leave

A perfect stocking stuffer for a dad in your life!
A perfect stocking stuffer for a dad in your life!

I love professional sports.

I hate how so many fans take sports too seriously and how sports radio hosts seem stuck in the Stone Age when it comes to valuing fatherhood.

Two years ago, MLB star Daniel Murphy took two games’ paternity leave, using MLB’s forward-looking policy, and was excoriated by some of the most prominent sports radio personalities for doing so. Thankfully, there was a swift backlash against these radio hosts, with one ESPN poll indicating 95% supported Murphy’s decision.

Two years later, the same dynamic has played out yet again. Boston Celtics’ center Al Horford recently missed one game to be at the birth of his daughter. Boston sports radio host Michael Felger somehow found this offensive.

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Work-Dad Success? Here’s some advice

How can we achieve work-dad success? My latest article, “12 Work-Life Balance Tips from a Working Dad” was just published in Success magazine. In it, I describe some research from Boston College’s New Dad studies and provide some advice for dads trying to juggle career success with being a great dad. Click here or on … Read more

Why I’m Excited About Amazon’s 30-Hour Work Week Experiment

Working a reduced schedule- something like a 30-hour work week- is often touted as a good alternate for working parents. Employees get reduced pay for reduced work, but keep their benefits. The employer keeps the employee, reducing turnover. What’s not to like? In practice, a 30-hour work week hardly ever works out well. The employee has “outed” … Read more

We Should All Have a Boss Like Joe Biden

Yesterday, a friend sent this to me on twitter:

I think this is tremendous, and sets a great example. The message for managers and bosses everywhere is simple: If Vice President Joe Biden can support the family lives of his employees, so can you. I mean, is his job any less important than yours?

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WooHoo! New York Implements Paid Family Leave!

Me, rallying for Family Leave Insurance in New York State
Me, rallying for Family Leave Insurance in New York State

New York is about to become the fourth state to provide paid family and medical leave. And like the plans enacted in California, New Jersey and Rhode Island, this benefit is funded through a small payroll deduction into a state-wide insurance fund. As an advocate for working parents and a business school professor who works closely with employers, I am excited by this news.

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The Good News From the Adam LaRoche Situation

The Adam LaRoche situation stirred controversy. However, it also validated involved fatherhood
The Adam LaRoche situation stirred controversy. However, it also validated involved fatherhood (Wikimedia/creative commons)

The Adam LaRoche situation, even with its controversy, validates how far we’ve come in recognizing the importance of involved fatherhood.

Baseball and fatherhood are my two favorite topics, so when the curious case of Adam LaRoche and his fatherhood-related exit from the Chicago White Sox broke last week, some asked me for my thoughts.

After all, the last time fatherhood and baseball crashed together like this was when Daniel Murphy was criticized for taking paternity leave two years ago. As that story was blowing up, I made sure to jump on it quickly, and got my first national TV interview, an article in the Wall Street Journal, and lots of other inquiries from journalists looking for some commentary.

This time around, though, I hesitated to jump in with my analysis. And I’m glad I did, as the details are murkier and the issue is not as black and white.

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Family Leave Insurance: The Best $28 I Spent Last Year

Family Leave Insurance gives New Jersians good bang for the buck
Family Leave Insurance gives New Jersians good bang for the buck

God, I hate doing my taxes. But as I was compiling my receipts, 1099s and I040s, I saw something interesting on my Fairleigh Dickinson University W2 form. It was a listing of the amount deducted from my paychecks last year as part of New Jersey’s Family Leave Insurance program. It was all of $28.

New Jersey is one of three states (New York may be next!) to provide paid family and medical leave. And like California and Rhode Island, this benefit is funded through a small payroll deduction into a state-wide insurance fund. Simply put, everyone pays in a small amount, and then, when one needs a family-related (most commonly a maternity or paternity leave) or medical leave (care for self or for a family member), they can draw from this insurance fund for wage replacement of two-thirds of one’s income, up to $604 per week, during the 6-week leave.

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