Finding Work-Life Balance Through Charitable Giving

How one man found purpose and better work-life balance when he discovered the importance of charitable giving. Here’s how we can make charity part of our work and our lives.

Sharing Experiences is a series of articles written by dads about their work-life experiences. These are shared in the hopes of generating conversation, sparking ideas, and letting dads know they are not alone in their work-family struggles. For more of these stories, click on the category link on the right-hand side of your screen.

A guest post by Noble McIntyre

Our guest blogger, Noble McIntyre, with his colleagues during his company's charity drive
Our guest blogger, Noble McIntyre, with his colleagues during his company’s charity food drive

Why Charitable Giving is Important

As we mature and develop our careers, the one resource we never seem to have enough of is time. As a personal injury attorney with a wife and three daughters, my days are frequently packed. Between commuting, handling clients, and attending my daughters’ various extracurricular activities, I have just enough time for my work and often just enough for my family — with very little left over.

A few years ago, I began to feel something was missing. My line of work frequently puts me in a position to help people who are injured and suffering, but taking law cases is not the same as giving selflessly to others. But with my work and family life already occupying so much of my time, how could I make more room for charitable giving? Organizing (or even attending) charity events would take time I simply didn’t have.

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Holiday Gratitude

Thanks for making me feel like the Richest Man in Town

Even better than this!

A few big milestones for FWF this week.  Thank you all for making them happen.

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Follow FWF, Raise Money for the National Fatherhood Initiative! (Update)

I am very grateful that, in the two months of FWF, we’ve built a readership and community.  According to WordPress.com’s site statistics, we’ve had over 3000 page views- that’s over 130 per post.  Thank you for coming to the blog, and especially for coming back.

But I’m not satisfied with a small but growing active readership- I want world domination! a large and growing active readership!

In my day job, I’m a management professor, so I always teach my students about the power of goal-setting and well-aligned incentives.  A few weeks ago, I set a goal for the blog: 100 readers who follow FWF through email, Twitter or WordPress by the end of the year.

Follow the Blog, Help a Worthy Cause

For incentive, I am donating $2 for every reader who signs up to follow the blog by the end of the year to the National Fatherhood Initiative, a well-established, national not-for-profit whose mission is to: “To improve the well-being of children by increasing the proportion of children growing up with involved, responsible, and committed fathers.” They provide resources, training and skill-building workshops for fathers all over the country, and pay special attention to helping military families and those in low-income communities.  This seems like an appropriate charity for FWF and something we can all get behind.

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Follow the Fathers, Work and Family Blog: Raise Money for the National Fatherhood Initiative!

I am very grateful that, in the first month and a half of FWFblog, we’ve built a readership and community.  According to WordPress.com’s site statistics, FWF is at over 2000 page views- that’s over 130 views per post.  Thank you for coming to the blog, and especially for coming back.

But I’m not satisfied with a small but growing active readership- I want world domination! a large and growing active readership!

Maybe this cute picture of me and Nicky will persuade you to support the National Fatherhood Initiative

In my day job, I’m a management professor, so I always teach my students about the power of goal-setting and well-aligned incentives.  So, I have set a goal for the blog: 100 readers who follow the FWF through email, Twitter or WordPress by the end of the year.   Right now, we’re at 29, so we have a way to go.

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