Female CEOs Support Paternity Leave

Female CEOs voiced their support for paternity leave
Female CEOs voiced their support for paternity leave

As if we needed another reason why we need more women in leadership!

Last week, I wrote about a Miami Herald CEO Roundtable in which they asked various male and female CEOs about paternity leave. Did they feel it was important? Do they offer it?

The responses of the male CEOs was decidedly mixed. Ranging from the depressing:

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Why Amazon Family Matters

amfam
Click to join 11,000+ in signing the Change.org petition

For the past few weeks, many in the dad blogging community have united around the cause to get Amazon.com to change the name of their parent-centric shopping site from “Amazon Mom” to “Amazon Family.”

To many, verbiage like “Amazon Mom” seems like a small concern. In the grand scheme of things, I guess it is. However, to me, these words are an indicator of how our society often undervalues fathers and, by implication, places an unfair burden on mothers. After all, if only “moms” are full “parents,” so much of the burden shifts to them. Many others have written about the societal implications of such messaging for both moms and dads, so today, I’d like to focus on how this notion that parenting is woman’s work insidiously makes its way into corporate culture- to the detriment of working dads, working moms, kids and employers themselves.

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How Family Support For Dads Also Helps Working Moms, Kids and Employers

My colleague’s story illustrates the negative ripple effects that a non-supportive employer has, not just on working dads, but also on their spouses, kids, and their own bottom line.

Employer support (or lack thereof) creates ripple effects for families (pixaby.com, creative commons)
Employer support (or lack thereof) creates ripple effects for families (pixaby.com, creative commons)

The other day, I was chatting with a new colleague. She had just returned from the workforce after having opted out of her career due to family demands. Her two young children had health problems, meaning that she and her husband needed some family support from their employers- but never received it.

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The Changing Role of Men at Work and at Home- A Conversation at Womenetics

I was recently asked to contribute a short piece on the changing role of men in work-family for Womenetics.com, a leading website for professional women.

I don't like to call myself an expert, but I like it when others do! (click on the pic for my essay)
I don’t like to call myself an expert, but I like it when others do! (click on the pic for my essay)

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My Latest at GMP: “How Drivel Like Hanna Rosin’s ‘Men Are Obsolete’ Harms Both Men and Women

Like most societal challenges, the effort to promote work-family balance will only succeed when both men and women work together. A recent article in Time.com sets progress back by denigrating men as obsolete. Here’s my recent article at Good Men Project in which I explain why such unserious journalism undermines what should be a dual-gender effort for more equality, opportunity and choice for all (please click on the picture for the full article).

A screencap of my recent Good Men Project article refuting Hanna Rosin's absurd claim that "Men Are Obsolete"
A screencap of my recent Good Men Project article refuting Hanna Rosin’s absurd claim that “Men Are Obsolete”

What do you think about arguments like “The End of Men”? Let’s discuss in the comments section.

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What’s a Working Dad to Do? (republished from HBR Blog)

On Wednesday August 21st, I published my first article at the Harvard Business Review Blog. The response to the piece has been great, and for quite a while it was one of the most read pieces at their site! For those who haven’t seen the article yet, here’s the beginning, plus a link to the … Read more

The Pew Research Report, Breadwinner Moms, Misleading Headlines and the Challenges of Dual-Income Households

The recent Pew Research Report focuses on “The Rise of Breadwinner Moms“. However, if you look beyond the headline into the data, the real take-away should be that the clear majority of households are “dual-earner/shared-care”– why don’t employers and our society realize this and start adapting for long-term success?

The Pew Study documents the frequency of different types of dual-income households
The Pew Study tracks the changes in household earnings over 50 years

The headline of the new Pew Study (released May 29th) is “Breadwinner Moms“- as their research shows that 40% of US households with kids either have a single mother as sole provider or have a dual-income arrangement in which the wife out-earns the husband (this caused the oldwhiteguys at FoxNews to wig out!)

Like most headlines, this is somewhat misleading. They only get to the 40% number by cobbling together the 11% never-married single mother households, the 14% single-mother-divorced households and the 15% of dual-parent households with female breadwinners. These are kinda three separate groups, no?

If you really dive into the data, what you find is that only 15% of two-parent families and 22.5% of dual-income families have the wife as the primary earner. While this is notable, and represents larger percentages than in the past, the fact is the vast, vast majority of families and dual-income families rely on the husbands for the larger share of the income.

The real take-away from the Pew Study should be that dual-income couples are the norm, and have been for some time.

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