Why I’m Excited About Amazon’s 30-Hour Work Week Experiment

Working a reduced schedule- something like a 30-hour work week- is often touted as a good alternate for working parents. Employees get reduced pay for reduced work, but keep their benefits. The employer keeps the employee, reducing turnover. What’s not to like? In practice, a 30-hour work week hardly ever works out well. The employee has “outed” … Read more

There Are 168 Hours in a Week: How Are You Using Yours?

A few weeks ago, Harvard Business Review Online published my latest article, “Relax, You Have 168 Hours This Week.” This is my eighth article for them (click here to see a list of them all), and one I am particularly proud of. In the piece, I use time management techniques to illustrate how we, as busy working parents can find enough time for career, family and life. Please click on the picture below or here to go to the full article, or see below for an excerpt.

Click here to read the full "168 Hours" article at HBR online
Click here to read the full “168 Hours” article at HBR online

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Welcome HBR Blog Readers!

“Knowing that we have 168 hours might be the motivation we need to prioritize and make the changes that will make our lives more satisfying” -From my August 1st Harvard Business Review Online article, “Relax, You Have 168 Hours This Week” Thank you for reading, and for visiting my site. For those of you who … Read more

Welcome Bloomberg Radio Listeners and HBR Readers!

If you’re a dad who works, this is a good time to celebrate. Not only because it’s Fathers’ Day, but because caring about fathers and their needs is no longer a touchy-feely, Phil Donahue kind of thing. Businesses, researchers, the media, and all manner of celebrities have been throwing the spotlight on men who enjoy … Read more

Reader Feedback: A Top Executive Who Promotes Work-Life Balance

A Harvard Business Review blog reader’s comment demonstrates that many senior managers are supportive of work-life balance.

I expected less enlightened management philosophies from my readers. I was happy to be wrong! photo credit: Kalexanderson via photopin cc
I expected less enlightened management philosophies from some of my readers. I was happy to be wrong! photo credit: Kalexanderson via photopin cc

When I think of the older readers of the Harvard Business Review, I imagine super-smart, tough, hard-working types with old-school management philosophies. So, when I wrote my latest article for the HBR blog, entitled “How to Be a Family-Friendly Boss” I was prepared for a backlash to my “progressive” thinking about management and work-family balance.

The backlash never came.

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Workplace Flexibility: The Key to Work-Family Balance?

Workplace flexibility is a key for working parents trying to balance work and family. Here are some questions that can help us assess the flexibility we have at work, and some ideas about how to leverage them.

a screencap of my recent HBR article
A screencap of my recent HBR article aimed at supervisors. What are its implications for us working dads? Keep reading to find out!

Last week, I wrote an article for the Harvard Business Review blog in which I advised well-intentioned supervisors on how to be more “family-friendly” while upholding performance standards. My advice was:

  1. Focus on What, Not How or When

  2. Get Better at Measuring Performance

  3. Delegate, Coach, and Let Your People Earn Trust

  4. Serve as a Work-Family Balance Role Model

The common thread for the first three items is allowing employees more flexibility in how, where and when they perform their jobs, while still maintaining high standards for what. Overall, I think it is sound advice for managers, and the piece was very well-received.

However, I largely write this blog to help my fellow working dads navigate work and family issues. So, what are the implications of this article for the working father?

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Chronic Overwork: The Dangers of Treating Your Career Marathon Like a Sprint

Chronic overwork can lead to work-family imbalance, reduced effectiveness and burnout. Occasional overwork is a necessity; chronic overwork is detrimental. Here’s why we need to pace ourselves. On October 11th, my second article for the Harvard Business Review blog was published. It was the most read and commented upon article on the HBR website for a whole week, and has … Read more

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